Residential Solar Panels Los Angeles – Increase Value of Your Home While Lowering Utility Bills

The biggest investment that Florida homeowners John Hammerstorm and Diane Marshall have made toward energy efficiency in their home is the 2.8-kilowatt solar panel system they installed on their rooftop. The photovoltaic panels efficiently convert sunlight into enough electrical current to provide for half of their household’s power needs. The couple says that their electric bills has reduced to an affordable price of $50 during the summer id the AC is used on a regular basis and only $15 when the AC isn’t in use.

If you have considered Residential Solar Installation Los Angeles there are a few things to consider such as the type of equipment that you will need. You should work with your contractor to determine what type of solar panels will work best with your home. One general guideline suggests 1 kilowatt per 1,000 square feet of your house. In addition to solar panels, the solar installation process requires a device called an inverter to convert the sun’s DC voltage into AC power. The price of such a system will vary from $15,000 to $35,000 depending on the location of your home. This cost can be significantly reduced with federal and local rebates and discounts.

Many states such as Texas have a rebate program that reimburses customers $4.50 per watt, enough to cover 45-75% of the total solar system Los Angeles cost. Arizona takes it a step further by offering a program that lets homeowners install solar energy devices without any increase to their property taxes. California offers several solar initiative rebates to those who install a qualifying solar system. These solar rebates vary according to location, system size, customer class, system performance and installation factors. The incentives are paid either as an upfront payment or a monthly payment based on performance over five years. Performance is calculated based on the design characteristics of the solar system such as panel type, tilt, orientation, shading, and more.

Going solar doesn’t mean you need to cut ties to your local supply grid if your utility company offers net metering. If this is offered, you can simply plug your existing power lines which are back in service after sundown and on rainy days. If your solar power system produces more power than you need, you may be able to sell the unused watts back to the local utility for a credit, making your electric meter spin backward. If there aren’t any local incentives available yet in your area, there are still ways to change that. John and Diane didn’t have any incentives available when they installed their solar system and so they put together a presentation for the utility’s board of directors and convinced them to adopt a net metering policy.